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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 158 (some duplicates have been removed)
." and the age of aware just spawned the number of exotic religions, including zen buddhism and hindu meditation and from there into the jesus freak youth movement which swept through the ranks of the drug-depleted and sex-sated surfers of california and and from there into the jesus freak youth movement which swe . now, imam, do you detect any impact of the affluence of today on the spirituality of your -- your flock? >> indeed. i do believe that if i were to go back 20 years or see where muslims are going now, i do believe that the economic situation of muslims and the worldwide community will influence the way muslims see islam and see islam's spirituality as the way out of the dispair, out of the harmlessness, out of the -- homelessness and poverty that mums limbs have been experienced in the last 20 years. >> you serve as a muslim chaplain of georgetown university which is a roman catholic university in the sense it's run by jesuit priests, right? >> indeed, yeah. >> now, how is that going? >> i think it has gone, so far, very well. i have enjoyed working with the jesuits, with the roman ca
to find out that money stands in the way of the public knowing more about her. >> reporter: for "religion & ethics newsweekly", i'm david tereshchuk. >>> the city of grand rapids, michigan, long ago became known as a place of strict dutch reformed calvinism. so in 2012, it was something of a surprise when grand rapids organized a year-long series of events all designed to promote interfaith understanding. by all accounts, the campaign was a great success, as judy valente reports. >> reporter: grand rapids, michigan, is a city with deep roots in conservative calvinist christianity -- a place where dancing and card-playing were once banned, mowing the lawn on sunday was frowned upon into the 1960s, and in more recent years, a professor who taught evolution at calvin college encountered harsh criticism. though the dutch reformed church and its more conservative offshoot, the christian reformed church, is still a strong presence here, grand rapids today is also home to 82 catholic parishes, 5 mosques, 2 synagogues, and hindu, buddhist and sikh temples. interfaith dialogue would have been cons
the rise of individualism in american life, the sustainability of social welfare programs, religion and population aging and we get to all of those in the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question that every reporter is asked by his or her editor when that per approaches the idea why does this matter, why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the demographics are what my friend it's like the tectonic plates shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny which is the oelwein sogegian know what the profile is than you are able to today what are the confines and the reality in this country. people are choosing to have fewer and fewer children. this is the first time in history that this happened voluntarily at a global scale and it's going to have far-reaching consequences for everyone. >> host: how do we know that it's falling, how is it measured and are we talking about a year or a few years, a decade and where has it happened? >> guest: they keep track of these things as you know how many people there are and how many people are born eac
in alabama heads into the fifth day. >>> leon panetta said his catholic religion had an impact on his life and death decisions. >>> and rumors of muhammad ali's death are premature. we'll explain. death are premature. we'll explain. "early today" starts right now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> very good monday morning to you. i'm veronica de la cruz. we begin with a developing tragedy in southern california. a bus carrying a tour group from tijuana collided with two other vehicles on the highway west of los angeles killing eight and injuring more. authorities say the driver reported brake problems as the bus came down the mountain. it rear-ended a car before flipping and hitting a pickup truck that was hauling a trailer. passengers described the scene. >> starts to move so fast, and the people start screaming. >> two or three minutes swerving in and out? >> yeah. >> everybody was scared. everybody was screaming. >> the bus was reportedly returning from a ski outing to big bear. >>> well, today president obama will travel to minneapolis to push his proposal for broader g
it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also share certain ethnicities and that is discrimination and that falls under title 6. it is not just about enforcing the laws that make it clear how the laws apply. it is, though, as we said, you can't get at this through enforcement alone. this is a culture that tolerates this and in too many ways promotes it. as tom mentioned we have an unprecedented partnership not just between our agencies but agencies across the federal government that the president has convened to bring our best resources and minds to bear to do something about it. there is now a web site, stopbullying.gov where a tool kit is being developed and these kinds of best practices are being promo
these different languages and religions and basically for the first 50 years, almost -- certainly first several decades, people back in washington were saying, what have we done here? we've conquered this land but dough don't understand and it we can't good afternoon it. we should just give it back. give it back to mexico. it's too hard to run this place. there was so much violence. there was slavery and there was hostage taking and -- just unfamiliar country that people in washington didn't know what to do with. that's part two. part three is about kit carson's role in the conquest of the navajo people, and everything he did with that. monster slayer it's called, and this is from the final act of his long career, and it's probably what he is best known for, this sort of a scorched earth campaign he led into navajo country that resulted in their conquest and their removal from their beloved lands, and this great experiment that went on to try to force the navajo to become -- to settle down and become farmers and christians living in this sort of reservation on the border with texas. so it's a b
a right to your religion. no help from the government at all on friday. >> this is part what have kathleen sebelius had to say. she said, today the administration is taking the next step in providing women across the nation with coverage of recommended preventive care at no cost, while reporting religious concerns. the administration believes it has met the concerns. >> well, shannon, for the many people whose religious rights are violated by this mandate, many of them have sued. they have been waiting for well over a year for something very simple, an exemption from the mandate. simply, that's what we do with people who have religious objections to laws. we exempt them. that's what these people have been waiting for and that's not what they got. the exemption that only applies to a house of worship was not expanded one inch. so the administration didn't do anything for the exemption or the business owners like hobby lobby. all they really did was propose a bookkeeping measure for certain religious organizations that may not really solve the problem at all. it wasn't a good feds for the re
is. i went from republicans to independents, to democrat. three reasons. number one, i want religion out of the party. i have a religion. that's my business. i have a political party. that's the political parties business. number two, women's issues. i don't personally believe in abortion, but i don't believe i have the rights tell my neighbor what they should do. i think the republican party needs to get out of people's bedrooms and back into the boardrooms. number three, the middle-class tax hikes their break-in instituted. we never recovered from that. to my city unions. all things that had middle-class workers. ending tax like state sales tax, all of these things it is strictly, so i know when it happened. it was in the reagan years. >> host: thanks, caller. >> guest: >> guest: a few republican come you a liberal one. undertake the supporters. she says she wants religion out of politics. i wonder she would've felt that way about the civil rights movement because it is actually martin luther king was not only a top her. he was also the reverend dr. martin luther king. the power of
-rights laws that prohibit firing, promoting and hiring based on race, age, national origin, religion, pregnancy, those immutable characteristics that we think are worthy of the protection of our civil rights laws. in most states there are modest exemptions to the employment at will dadoctrine, amount wrongful discharge. when an employer requires someone to break the law in order to keep their job. or if an employer is doing something that is in violation of a well-defined written public policy. other than that, we give employers in this country wi de latitude, because we have a free market economy, because we recognize the person that takes the risk and set up a business and puts their monetary and human capital into it, that they have rights to run their business the way they see fit. we are very, very reluctant to place any sort of restrictions on that. again, this is a small one. not saying that you have to hire anybody that is not fully qualified for your job. in essence, what these laws do rainout are saving employers from themselves, because if they are ignoring all of the unem
in prayer each week, members of the prayer caucus also work together to preserve the presence of religion, faith and morality in the marketplace of ideas. we're seeing increased efforts to remove references to god and fate from the public square. activists seek to remove god from our national motto and pledge of allegiance. they seek to prevent city and county councils from praying and recognizing our nation's spiritual heritage. and they seek to silence people who wish to live out their faith. members of the prayer caucus have countered these efforts successfully, ensuring that our history remains in tact for future generations. in the 112th congress, i introduced a resolution reaffirming our national motto, in god we trust, and encouraging its public display in public buildings. the measure passed overwhelmingly by a vote of 396-0. some asked why we needed to reaffirm our national motto. yet if left unstated, the motto could be changed in a de facto matter. in november, 2010, before a worldwide audience and a much publicized speech focusing on the united states relationship -- united st
for the president and members of congress to show off their religion one day a year? >> i think it's very odd. i think that there is a little too much overt religiosity going on. and then it suddenly put back in the pocket and then -- >> bill: no, i agree. i grew up under the creed that you did not wear your religion on your sleeve. and you know, you had it. it was real. it was genuine but you didn't brag about it. the problem i have with the prayer breakfast is everybody gets up and tries to outdo each other and how my faith is so strong and i pray all the time and i'm so close to jesus. come on. >> right. exactly. >> bill: it is not something to brag about. i don't think it's real if you brag about it. >> are you allowed to be diverse at the prayer breakfast? >> bill: no. no. it is one way. something else, sort of kind of related. we talked earlier in the week, victoria, about the fact that we've struggled with same-sex marriage in this country for so long, the president came around on it last year after evolving, he said. he did evolve. in the right direction. and took him a long time. but st
. religion does well. this wall behind the paperback fiction combat rolls out here on a steady basis. both for locals and visitors who want something light to read. the author breakfast meats here all winter long before the metropolitan opera, which comes to santa fe along with millions of other viewers across the world. there is a breakfast and a lecture here. we do a lot with music and arts. the history of santa fe is vivid with two major cultures. native american, hispanic, and the anglo. now, that is actually oversimplifying things, but each one carries such a heritage that the writers are anxious to share. we boast the best of the young native american writers working today. we do events here. we boast the best spanish colonial art market. we sell books at the indian market, which is the largest art market in the world. for many years we have sold looks in the spanish market. again, the largest hispanic market in the world. we are falling all over each other but the sharing and the support that is universal makes it such a wonderfully exciting place to be. >> in the very early day, sa
. you know, it is an area that does not want somebody else's religion or life. the one better health care and better schools. they visit washington and do not understand the fight in a lot of ways. >> specifically when it comes to technology related issues, do you hear anything? >> there is concern about innovation and the role that current law has in the area of copyright and patents stifling innovation. that is typical to remedy. we have a patented build that i did not vote for last year, having worked on it for 12 years. it did not do what we hoped it would do. we have an overarching scheme on copyright enforcement that is probably not that positive in terms of technology and innovation. i'm sure you all remember soapa. i'm talking about individuals who are inventing things and creating things real that there is a problem in terms of the copyright and he can become together and make sure that the laws work in the internet age? that is something i went to work on. i will be introducing some bills. try to get a discussion going. >> when you walk around here, do you see a lot of cons
in the classrooms, particularly say on the subject of religion? >> well, in the hearing, i asked the question about a less on on islam that was sent to me by an enterprising parent and let me share this with you, alisyn, it was parents doing their homework and trying to get information that brought this to our committee's attention and so they found this lesson on islam and in texas we do teach all religions and students should learn about all religions, parents, i found it odd a full lesson on islam and not equal on christianity or any other religion. in the last segment, the answer was we changed that and that's not the program now and that's the danger of online learning, online learning is the future and it's terrific that, that's how students learn. if they're learning history and see the name patrick henry and it's linked to patrick henry, they can go in areas they can never go in a textbook. >> that's the wave of the future, so, how can you be sure of what the kids in texas and across the country are going to be taught. how can you change this curriculum now? >> yes. >> well, we're going to
. "our laws, our literature, our religion, our arts "all have their roots in greece. "but for greece, we might still have been savages and idolaters." the human form and the human mind attained to a perfection in greece which has impressed its image on those faultless productions whose very fragments are the despair of modern art and which can never cease to delight mankind until the extinction of the race. in the 18th and 19th centuries, europeans surrounded themselves with the images of greece and rome. they created for themselves personal museums which displayed their wealth, taste, and learning and idealized the virtues of reason, liberty, and justice. in this way, they elevated-- and even masked-- their mundane relationships with land ownership and manufacture, trade and empire, and they exported these ideals and the visual language which expressed them all over the world-- to the americas, the indies, and beyond. it is appropriate, then, that these are the first pictures we see in a series on the tradition of western art. we could have started in the caves of lascaux or the temples
that was all because we had to bowed down to the religion of the free market and what can never be repaid regarding t.a.r.p. is the contradiction, the double standard that when the plutocrats got into trouble, all of that garbage about the free market milton friedman and all that stuff got thrown a right out the window and said it is the double standard. it's the hypocrisy, the contradiction that can never be repaid. thanks. >> guest: let me talk about that because the caller raises an interesting point and this is something i've put a report out this past week. one of the things we learned in 2008 is that our financial system was very vulnerable to these highly interconnected financial institutions, these too big to fail companies. not only were the highly interconnected with each other, but what they learned is that their failure actually threatened american jobs and american pensions and american mortgages and that was shocking. i don't think that the regulators were prepared to deal with that and so even with the bailout coming at preventing the failure of some of the institutions, th
says he's not homophobic but stands by his religion. the oregon department of justice is investigating. >>> finally in missouri, a kansas city church is showing a sign of support for gay boy scouts. the church posted a gay pride banner, welcoming all members of the boy scouts of america. the youths organization is set to discuss lifting the ban on gays and lesbians this week. >>> turning to sports, super bowl xlvii looked like a blowout. but turned out to be a thriller. in the first quarter, ravens' quarterback joe flacco connected with antoine bolden for touchdown pass and early lead. in the second, baltimore scored two more touchdowns to make it look like a blowout. they went to halftime with the 21-3 lead. in the third, the ravens' jacoby jones had a record with a 109-yard kickoff return. the longest in super bowl history. and that made it 28-6, ravens over the 49ers. then the power goes out in the superdome. it took 34 minutes before the lights were back on and play was restarted. then momentum shifted quickly as san francisco scored two touchdowns in less than 2 1/2 minutes. in th
muslims, more problems. >> yeah, because their religion requires them to wage jihad. if you are a muslim, up better be out there jihadding away. >> which explains all the wars we've had with ms. lums in indonesia, india and dearborn, michigan. clearly we need new tanks or new money but don't worry the army has a great way of raising some. >> one of the ways that we kept equipment costs down is we sell it to our friends. the saudis, kuwaities, egyptians. >> waiting we're selling our bad ass tanks to muslims? our general military issues and affairs expert is going to flip. >> selling our tanks to saudi arabia is not a likely scenario. >> just so you we are selling our tanks. >> we are? >> that's right. >> i don't -- i haven't followed that aspect of the story. if we're selling tanks to saudi arabiaans, good. they are our allies in some respects. >> some respects, not good enough. i gotta get rid of these tanks before our jihadi frenive enemies get ahold of them. >> we have tanks. at big al's tank em poreium. they are do it all. of course, getting traffic! [laughter] we'll not be undersold
to come together and to come up with a reasonable solution here that would not infringe on a religion and also keep women protected and you had those i guess attempting to enflame this as a war on religion and the other things that were accused. when we talked with you and when you became a household name at the beginning of this story. >> yeah. this is just another step in what the administration has said that they wanted to do, which you're exactly right. to find a path forward to cover health care without infringing on a potential concern. and i think what's important to note is some of the folks continuing to object to this policy are actually worried about employer who is are private companies not religiously affiliated employers in any way but the boss has a particular religious concern and they want to deny their employees particular types of health care. if you take a step back and think about that, that's you work at a restaurant, you work at a store and your boss is able to deny you leukemia coverage or blood transfusions or any number of medical concerns someone might have
in the battle with some religion non-profit organizations over the requirement they offer birth control coverage in their health insurance packages. while today's shift is significant, it also leaves out a big group that is also suing the government. chief washington correspondent james rosen tells us what triggered the change. >> under the new rules proposed by health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius non-profit religious employers will be able to opt out of the obamacare mandate of female contraceptive in the healthcare plan. instead insurers will be required to provide coverage, including standard birth control and items like the morning after pill. the white house says the modifications meet president obama's overarching goals. >> we had to ensure the women have access to preventative services like contraception. the policy also respects religious beliefs. >> catholic league bill donahue held the announcement as a sign of good will toward the catholic community. because the private sector firms with religious objections are not covered by the proposal and many insurance firms ar
poor of all colors stripes tongues and religions that your country wronged you in separate and discrete ways, gronke with horrific and lingering consequences, wronged you in some cases from long ago and for a very long time, to a degree that would morally compel any civilized nation serious and sustained attention. >> guest: we don't want to talk about it. we still don't want to talk about it. we run from it. we now call it victimization, so it's not to be raised. it's a sad truth. >> host: why did you leave the country? >> guest: well i was as much going to a place as leaving a place. i have been going to st. kitts in the caribbean for 25 years, and it's a small island. it is made for someone like me who doesn't like big crowded places, big cities. it's an exquisitely beautiful place with mountains and clear blue water and a kind of smallness that allows the kind of intimacy you seldom go downtown and don't see someone that you know. but the biggest piece of it is that the woman i loved and married is from st. kitts, so we had decided many years ago that we were going to build a home t
or the value of religion and i do think that's one of the reasons why president obama continues the tradition going his fifth he year here. there's something religiously for politicians it's a common language, trying to bridge the gap between themselves and a number of americans. we've heard president obama do that in past years in very real terms. we've learned things about him. last year we learned that he prays every day. he said he gets up in the morning, says a brief prayer and spends some time in scripture and devotion and obviously talking i think a lot in evangelical tones at the time you look at it in this event that, yes, it's not supposed to be a political event, but it was in an election year where a number of normally, i would say evangelical republican supporters had questions about mitt romney and you saw president obama maybe able to seize this moment, so i think sometimes it serves a political opportunity. sometimes it serves this sort of, serves as an opportunity for the president to reach out, and certainly at a time right now when he's dealing with some very divisive issue
they are discriminating against other religions. wait until you hear what the school wants to do with them. >> with super bowl sunday days away we have the school and gadgets and game that will help you score big with your next party. first on this day in history back in 1968 the king elvis became a father. elvis' wife priscilla gave birth. hey! did you know that honey nut cheerios has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! ♪ wow. [ buzz ] delicious, right? yeah. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... ♪ well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? bee happy. bee healthy. with clusters of flakes and o's. oh, ho ho... it's the honey sweetness. i...i mean, you...love. i>> good morning to you. welcome to "fox & friends first". it is friday. you have made it through the workweek. congratulations. it is time for the top 5@5:30. we begin with a fox news alert. it is a third day of the tense hostage negotiation in the state of alabama. a man holding a 5-year-old boy in an under ground bunker. cops haven't officially released the man's name yet but he is known to stay in
of resistance to federal rule in new mexico. what is going on today with the rich and diverse bodies of religion in santa fe, but we constructed that on top of this foundation of faith being part of santa fe's history from the very start. santa fe has been the subject of many books by many writers, a diverse range of writers, and this book has a terrific bibliography for anyone who wants to read more about santa fe. >> and now more from santa fe, new mexico, home to about 80,000 people and 250 art galleries. santa fe boasts a rich historical and literary culture. with the help of our local cable partner, comcast, booktv takes a tour of collected works bookstore, one of santa fe's 17 independent bookstores. >> welcome to collected works bookstore and coffeehouse. we're in santa fe, new mexico. my name is dorothy massey, and my daughter and co-owner have owned collected works for the last 18 of its now 35 years old as santa fe's oldest and, we think, best in the city. santa fe has a population of 80,000 people, and it supports no less than 17 independent bookstores. how does collected works and th
freedom of expression, freedom of religion, those are not just american values. the world agreed to those values and we are going to stand up for them. it is not always easy. we have to pick our time. on the first level, do what we do because it is in our interests. we have to continue to do that. as you got to the second level, how you adapt that to the world of today requires us to be more clever we are trying to do that. countering violent extremism. maybe there are 50,000 violent homicidal extremist in the world. but they are able to maximize their impact and their messaging through the internet. what we have tried to do is to get in there with them, to undermine them and to rebut them. it is something we did in the cold war. more lessons i think we can transfer from the cold war to today. we don't have some monolithic soviet union. we were engaged in pushing out our ideas and our values, refuting communist propaganda. the cold war ended. "democracy has triumphed. we do not have to do that anymore." that's a terrible mistake. i have tried to convince congress and others if we do not h
's affiliated in a nonprofit way with a religion and against your beliefs, for example if you are a university or if you are a health system, they have made accommodations to ensure that you don't have to be involved in the direct provision the payment, the contracting the referral or any of the arrangements for ensuring that -- >> what about -- what about private companies like hobby lobby? the owners object on, you know, moral reasons that they don't want to pay for contraception for their employer, employees. >> i know folks have tried to talk about this as a religious liberty issue. that feels a bit like a smoke screen for folks who are really trying to impose their views about birth control on others. there is nothing in this law which in any way impedes an employer's ability to exercise his or her own religious beliefs. but there is nothing which says that religious liberty requires you to impose your beliefs on others. and by allowing for these accommodations for religious institutions but ensuring that -- in the private sector, if you are a business that's operating in the public secto
else's religion or somebody else's life. it's an area that just so thed to pass -- just voted to tax themselves so we could have better health care and better schools and better transportation. they look at washington and don't understand the fight in a lot of ways. >> host: specifically when it comes to technology-related issues, though, do you hear anything that your constituents -- >> guest: well, yes. there is concern about innovation and the role that current law has in the area of copyright and patent in stifling innovation. that's difficult to remedy. we had a patent bill that i actually ended up not voting for last year having worked on it for the years -- for 12 years that really didn't do what we'd hoped it would do. we've got an overarching scheme on copyright enforcement that is probably not that positive in term ors of technology -- terms of technology innovation. i'm sure you all remember the sopa brouhaha of last year. we stopped the overreach from the copyright max laws, but the technology companies -- i'm just talking about individuals who are inventing things and cr
somebody else's religion are somebody else's life. it's an area they voted to tax themselves we could have better health care and better schools. they look at washington and don't understand the fight in a lot of ways. >> host: specifically when it comes to technology related issues, do you hear anything that your constituency wants? >> guest: there is concern about innovation and the role that the current law has in the area in stifling innovation. that is difficult to remedy. we had a bill that i ended up not voting for last year having worked on it for 12 years that really didn't do what we had hoped it would do. we have got an overarching scheme on copyright enforcement that is probably not that positive in terms of technology innovation. i am sure you all remember the sofa brouhaha last year. we stop the overreach from the copyright board that the -- i'm not talking about the company's. i'm just talking about individuals who are inventing things and creating things feel that there is a problem in terms of the copyright regime and we come together and make sure that it works in the int
race, age, national origin, religion, pregnancy, those amiable characteristics we think are worthy of the protections of our civil rights laws. in most states, there are modest exemptions to this employment at will doctrine around wrongful discharge. when an employer requires somebody to breakable law and order to keep their job or if an employer is doing something that is in violation of some well- defined ridden public policy. other than that, we give employers in this country wide latitude because we have a free market economy, because we recognize the person or entity that takes the risk and sets up the business and puts their monetary and human capital into it, that they have rights to run their businesses the way they see fit. we are very, very reluctant to place any sort of restrictions on that. this is but a small one. i am not saying you have to hire anybody that is not fully qualified. in essence, what these laws do, right now they are saving employers from themselves. if they are ignoring all the unemployed workers, they really could be missing the best qualified person
will be submerged and the arabs will impose sharia or whatever else their islamic religion requires. >> but when you look at the obvious oppression of nearly 2 million palestinians on the gaza strip in particular, it's a terribly depressing -- >> sure. >> helpless situation. >> and they could change it. they could change it. >> can only they change it or do the israelis have to also give a little bit? >> of course. >> everything about compromise? >> of course the israelis have to give, and they will. and omar, who was the prime minister, said he was within a hair's breadth of dealing with abu abbas, but it's the fear that the palestinian leadership has that if they enter into a treaty with israel, they will be murdered. >> when you see the political rhetoric being deployed not just there but in washington in particular, it's so vicious now. >> it is. >> you went through a bit of this yourself, very personal in nature. >> yeah. >> when you see it now, is it as bad as it has ever been, do you think? >> worse. i enjoyed my stay in congress. most people today do not. too many people who have been electe
, religion, etc. discrimination in the fact as opposed to judging the size of eggs or something, being discriminate. and so by giving it a name, it started to have its own life. the ability of a president to name something -- i'm jumping ahead a little bit. but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress. it was from day one in this country the president in the beginning of the year would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and roosevelt in 1934 says, oh, i'll give it a name, calls it the state of the union. so a lot of these testimonies which were sort of created by presidents, we think, are there from day one. in fact, they're ones that have been added later. and, again, some of them are just wonderful. i mean, i'll just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term first lady. that did not exist. he applied it to dolly madison. that was the first anyone had ever used that term. he said the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was keep the ball rolling. i'm jumping around a little bit, but it's sort of fun. woodrow wilson had
's religion, democracy. every american loves democracy. i grant that. i plead guilty to taking that drug. i am right there with you. there is much more going on here. anybody who knows the middle east understands that the borders were drawn around peoples who do not want to live together. we have seen this in israel. palestinians and jews do not want to live together. we could say, let's have democracy. jews do not want a one state solution. neither the palestinians. it is not about democracy in palestine israel. we said we are going to make democracy in iraq. they pushed the sunnis out of every job in the military, government, education system. that is what is going to happen. anybody who thinks that when the sunnis takeover in syria that they are going to incorporate the national institutions are full and themselves. those institutions have been jammed full of the minorities who have had their foot on the throat of the sunnis for the last 50 years. the aloe-ites who dominate the military structure and tons of other ministries and fill them up with minorities and sunnis who are sympathetic to
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 158 (some duplicates have been removed)